Continuity of Construction

Architecture marks the character of a place longer than its inhabitants, who offer the timeline of evolution. Blending past with future is a running theme in much of my work—a curiosity to not ignore the rearview mirror. But mine is more than a desire not to burn bridges, it is a commitment to learn from the past. Through the research I do for illustration, I become immersed in subjects enough to present, simply and symbolically, their essences. I hope that I can extend my imagination, through modern technology, help from friends, and research, back in time. Working on a series of Hessen historic homes, I am very grateful to cousin Tom Euler, mayor of Allendorf, who has assisted in this time-travel adventure.

What strikes me most about the architecture in Allendorf (the new homes mirror the old) versus the architecture of where I, as a descendant live near Chicago, reveals the a difference in lifestyle values. There, the street side of the homes are formal and uninviting. Gates close off the house entrance as well as enclose courtyards. Where I live, the entrance doors are on the front, have with walkways and steps up to a porch. If there is not room for a small front yard, there is always a median with trees and grass. In Allendorf, the gardens, trees, and grass are hidden behind the street facades. Yet essentially, the interior floor plans of the homes are probably similar. The silhouette of peaked roof and outline is similar; barns become garages.

The differences between the feeling of a central European village and a midwestern United States town demonstrates how architecture both dictates and reflects the lifestyle of its inhabitants. As I draw structures in a town of ancestors, I get a perspective of the culture preserved by descendants and the cultural change the immigrants embraced. —always inspired, Liane

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Historic Access— An exploration of family origins leads back to 1500 Allendorf/Lahn-Giessen, Germany. Through a friendship, an amazing discovery, and a place that integrates natural beauty, history, and contemporary living, there is much to inspire. They are proud of many houses that were build in the late 1600s and early 1700s. A series of illustrations captures some of these historical gems and the impact of time.

Spirit of Place: Creation versus Preservationexamines a life-long dilemma of balance. There is a trend in Allendorf to plaster over the original half-timber skeletons. From an American point-of-view, these wooden patterns offer a warmth, coziness, and charm. But, it may be that to the residents, that makes an area appear old-fashioned or out of date. These homes, though hundreds of years old, are very much within date! The plaster lends a geometry, simplicity, and unity, while following the shapes and design. Taking an illustration that I did of Obergasse 7 in Allendorf, I imagine what it must have looked like when my ancestors lived there. Most of the homes that I have drawn would be familiar to them.

Finding Foundations It is impressive how much of the past is preserved in Hesse, considering the turmoils that challenge survival. Allendorf is proud of its central old town that has evolved for almost four hundred years. Any of these could have been homes to ancestors, today occupied by cousins.  From the center of town, illustrating the historic buildings along Obergasse is a walking-tour of the imagination. It represents a continuity very rare in the “new world,” and a determination for preservation that continues from generation to generation. Through this journey, I find a kindred spirit asking many of the same questions.

Historic Hessen Houses— Several of the Heritage Cultural homes display the half timber construction. From an American viewpoint, their wood patterns convey a warmth and charm. Distinctive consistency gives a harmony to the ancient streets, and the mix of new between the old still maintains style. It turns out that I am descended from three of the founding families, and discover much in common with cousin Tom Euler, mayor of Allendorf.

Please see this related example of my illustrations:

beforeafter-house200Drawing Backwards in Time Although a building may have endured many changes since built, hints of its original form exists. Sometimes old photographs show how a house looked, but most often, there are no images. Illustration can fill the gap. I have always wondered what my house was like in 1888 when new. It certainly does not look the same now! With an enclosed front porch, room additions, siding, and decorative shutters, its character is totally transformed. So I went to City Hall, researched the permits and historic records, and concluded with this interpretation.

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CONTACT:

Liane Sebastian wears an artist’s hat, designer’s coat, and editor’s shoes.

BLOG: http://www.publishingpioneer.wordpress.com
PORTFOLIO: http://www.lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/liane.sebastian
LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian
EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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The Pioneers of the Pioneers: ironwork innovators

A common mission could bring ancestors together, as could religion or ethnicity. The former encourages diversity, whereas the latter two encourage sameness. Though it is human nature to have divisions between groups, diversity brings innovation. This is displayed in my lineage—a lesson discovered.

Americans identify with our immigrant ancestors—the pioneering progenitors. Yet, these courageous souls were the products of many earlier ones. For example, the Thirty Years War of the early 1600s, redefined the European social structure. It was like wiping the chalkboard and writing new topics. Genetically, the loss of population had great effect. Founding families became established.

Rebuilding after a war takes heroic effort. Survivors are defined by dramatic change and must begin a new life from devastation. “Ore and Origins: pre-industry pioneers” explores this evolution.

Most people study European history via the war portrayals. But there is a bigger story to be told in the rebuilding process. A personal level makes it more understandable. It is perhaps the major reason I am fascinated with genealogy: through the stories of everyday people, and how they coped with societal dictates, history becomes clarified. It is through understanding where we have been that we discover where we are heading.

As a gift to my family, in constructing our Family Reunion Book, I created this map to express the events that created a new economic foundation. This group of ancestors stands out because they assembled in one place around 1700, to rebuild an industry, and stayed there for generations to do it. This is unusual.

There is a funneling down of proximities because, eventuality, ancestors must converge to procreate! But my immigrant great great grandfather who came to Milwaukee from Züsch, brought with him a consistency where all his ancestors worked at the same enterprise for hundreds of years. Their story of convergence is a tale of opportunity, contribution, and planting seeds for the industrial revolution.

The ironworkers who assembled after multiple war devastations were pioneers in a different way than the honored Atlantic-crossers. They constructed from the ruins of the past despite the challenges of the present. They set the stage for industrial progress, which may be credited later to the British, but evidence shows, began in Germany.  I call them unsung heros of progress.

—always inspired, Liane

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Prior to the Industrial Revolution, which began in Britain in the late 1700s, manufacturing was often done in people’s homes, using hand tools or basic machines. Industrialization marked a shift to powered, special-purpose machinery, factories and mass production. The iron and textile industries, along with the development of the steam engine, played central roles in the Industrial Revolution, which also saw improved systems of transportation, communication and banking.” http://www.history.com/topics/industrial-revolution

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CONTACT:

Liane Sebastian wears an artist’s hat, designer’s coat, and editor’s shoes.

BLOG: http://www.publishingpioneer.wordpress.com

PORTFOLIO: http://www.lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/liane.sebastian

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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Ancestor Access: Allendorf an der Lahn

Visualizing places of origin can bring genetic stories to life. I like to follow the mysteries of the family tree and see what the facts reveal. This leads me to read a lot about the histories of the towns of origin.

This journey has led to my earliest roots in Allendorf/Lahn. Tom Euler, Allendorf’s resident historian and mayor, has assisted me in research for illustrating buildings that have survived for over 300 years. I created a series of images that express how they successfully blend the new while preserving the old.

Most architecture that is well-studied tends to be grandiose. Yet, it is the modest that more tells the story of history’s impact.

As two ancient lanes cross by a large linden tree, the tiny village grew. Today, vintage houses line these same streets. The distinction and charm of their blend inspires.
Please see “Finding Foundations” and
Historic Hessen Houses.

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About Obergasse 1:

The old “bakery” that I illustrated is in the center of the ancient town. Tom Euler sent me pages from a book published on Allendorf’s buildings about forty years ago. From it, I learned the history of many structures, including this one that I chose due to its location and its charm. Quoting from a translation, Tom’s book, Stadtteil Allendorf Gesamtanlage Dorfkern,  states:

A predecessor of the present bakery was already in place before 1700. In 1727 it was thoroughly renovated, parts of the old building being demolished. As there was no other place in the village, one of the ovens of the bakery and probably the old guardhouse was broken off. In 1816, the squatter house was built on the vacated site. Equipped with a storage floor for fruits, it also served as a local prison. The building, which was combined with the bakery under one roof, received in 1855 a hose drying tower. The storage area above the actual baking house also served traditionally as accommodation for travelers. Curiously bought the municipality 1847 a militarily landmark from the ‘prince. Hess government’ and set it up as a deflector at the corner of the building. The long-stretched, saddle-roofed building, whose half-timbered facade is visible on the north side, has recently been renovated. Together with the now renovated Dorflinde, it marks the center of the village. The historically grown, multifunctional building has a high memorial and identification value for the Allendorf population. It is a cultural monument from the point of view of [architectural] history, social history and science.”

—always inspired, Liane

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CONTACT:

Liane Sebastian wears an artist’s hat, designer’s coat, and editor’s shoes.

BLOG: http://www.publishingpioneer.wordpress.com

PORTFOLIO: http://www.lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/liane.sebastian

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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Historical Hessen Hints

Coincidentally, many genealogy records begin first with the rise of literacy in the late 1500s, and second with the end of the Thirty Years War in the 1600s—especially in southwestern Germany and Northeastern France. The church (through christenings, marriages, and funerals) and government (through taxes and wills), recorded citizens; a few towns preserved documents from war devastation. For the first time, as average people learned to write, they started keeping family records. So it is the beginning for most surname databases.

With about twenty Hessian ancestor surnames that begin in the 1580s, I read about the history of their villages. Most were destroyed in the war, along with many family members. Based on data, most women and children survived. There are town documents of “war damage” reports as the dust settled. Some families rose in status, others perished.

Thirty Years WarHistory says that when villages were in the path of the marching armies, the women and children fled to a walled village for safety or a hidden refuge in the woods. But beyond knowing that, something happened in the late 1630s; finding out what happened is the hard part! I look specifically for the Giessen and Wetzlar regions of Hesse. The family numbers reflect that by the time of the treaty in 1648, it had been resolved for a while. Marriages and birthrates had gone back to normal.

In thinking about the experience of abandoning home for safety led me to have an image idea. Click here to see the full illustration. I changed the farm to a village, as both were vulnerable. The larger one better expresses the large army.

Determined to understand these beginnings, the early 1600s are the dawn of the modern era for many reasons:
• distribution of printed information
• rise in literacy
• improved weapons
• fall of feudalism
• increase of private ownership
• increase in diversity of religion
• consolidation of principalities
• beginning of urbanization
• end of the Renaissance
• setup for Age of Enlightenment in 1700s
• era of exploration prior to mass colonizations

How these qualities filter down to the lifestyles inherent in small villages is the true measure of change. The tragedy is to be the location of war after a long period of peace. Along with invasions came plague and starvation, so those who survived all of this were influential. The stories can be told in the data numbers and the comparison, or embellishment, of the history going on around it. Solving mysteries in the family charting means the effect of their context.

My exploration proceeds in “The Thirty Years War Reset.” It makes me want to know what happened to them, and I am sure many others with similar roots share such a fascination.  —Always inspired, Liane

Beginning a historic portrait, I have illustrated some of the living residential treasures in Allendorf an der Lahn, Giessen Germany. With several family branches that go back to the late 1500s, the story against a tumultuous background is developing.

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Please see these other examples of my informational illustrations:

sebastian-surname-search200Search for Sebastian Surname” identifies my search for the origins of my surname, Sebastian, in Baden, Germany. Other than my ancestor that came to Milwaukee in 1845, it seems that back in the homeland, they may have perished. Unlike other surnames on my family tree, it is not easy to trace this one to now. I created this graphic to use in my appeal for information. I have isolated an individual in Germany that drops off the information records in the mid-1700’s. So this is a test to see if anyone in the network can offer assistance. I prepared a simple graphic to attract the eye versus just pose the question, and composed a blog entry with more detail.

Control of the NarcissistSee the Clues: Dangerous Behavior of the Narcissist” identifies the insidious manipulations of the narcissist that are easy to miss. Don’t be a victim of this common personality disorder that undermines progress. As an artist, I have dealt with many in my career, and victimized by a few. The illustration is my visual depiction on how the narcissist manipulates. The article, The Control of the Narcissist is what to do about it. I also include a research project on the topic I wrote a few years ago that has helped  many friends and associates who have suffered from the sting of narcissistic behavior.

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CONTACTS:

Liane Sebastian wears an editor’s hat, designer’s coat, and artist’s shoes.

PORTFOLIO: https://lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com/portfolio/

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Liane-Sebastian-Illustration-742565389187170/

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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See the Clues: Dangerous Behavior of the Narcissist

Control of the NarcissistThe insidious manipulations of the narcissist are easy to miss. Don’t be a victim of a common personality disorder that undermines progress. As an artist, I have dealt with many in my career, and victimized by a few. The illustration is my visual depiction on how the narcissist manipulates. The article, The Control of the Narcissist is what to do about it. I also include a research project on the topic I wrote a few years ago that has helped  many friends and associates who have suffered from the sting of narcissistic behavior.

Earlier posts are examples from my recent portfolio on symbolic illustrations and information graphics:

Sebastian Surname Origins Map• MAP ILLUSTRATION:

Proximity and Progress: Surname Origins
A map that tells a story has an accurate and focused simplicity. Designing a topological structure, this one presents the oldest surname roots to mine:  Sebastian, including Heydt, Hammer, Trautwein, Christler, Pruet, Jungbluth, Reichart, and Ritzmann, created for our family reunion this summer. Please click here to see full-sized map and notes on its creation.

Sebastian survival #3

• INFORMATION GRAPHICS

To prepare a Family Book from genealogy research, I participate in Facebook groups. Everyone doing family history investigation has “brick walls.” I have isolated an individual in Germany that drops off the information records in the mid-1700’s. So this is a test to see if anyone in the network can offer assistance. I prepared a simple graphic to attract the eye versus just pose the question, and composed a blog entry with more detail. “Search for Sebastian Surname” explains the research so far.

—Always inspired, Liane

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CONTACTS:

Liane Sebastian wears an editor’s hat, designer’s coat, and artist’s shoes.

PORTFOLIO: https://lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com/portfolio/

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Liane-Sebastian-Illustration-742565389187170/

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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Geography and Genealogy

To reveal the story in any surname means visualizing where it comes from. It has geographic proximity and community context. While creating a map illustration for my family reunion this summer, there is lot more information from simple numbers than I ever expected.

Sebastian Surname Origins Map• MAP ILLUSTRATION:

Proximity and Progress: Surname Origins
A map that tells a story has an accurate and focused simplicity. Designing a topological structure, this one presents the oldest surname roots to mine:  Sebastian, including Heydt, Hammer, Trautwein, Christler, Pruet, Jungbluth, Reichart, and Ritzmann, created for our family reunion this summer. Please click here to see full-sized map and notes on its creation.

Sebastian survival #3

• INFORMATION GRAPHICS

To prepare a Family Book from genealogy research, I participate in Facebook groups. Everyone doing family history investigation has “brick walls.” I have isolated an individual in Germany that drops off the information records in the mid-1700’s. So this is a test to see if anyone in the network can offer assistance. I prepared a simple graphic to attract the eye versus just pose the question, and composed a blog entry with more detail. “Search for Sebastian Surname” explains the research so far.

—Always inspired, Liane

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CONTACTS:

Liane Sebastian wears an editor’s hat, designer’s coat, and artist’s shoes.

PORTFOLIO: https://lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com/portfolio/

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Liane-Sebastian-Illustration-742565389187170/

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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Search for Symbolic Clarity

Most of my time is spent producing projects, not talking about them. To pause, and take a step back, is a wise thing to do. Sharing means committing to a perspective.  From experience, I work best when I jump around between several projects. Each time I take a break and work on something else, I am able to go back to the first project with a clarity that propels the finish. Working on much more than I can publish, here are three current postings that reflect some of my creative directions:

Chernoff cancer screening icon100

• CLIENT ILLUSTRATION

Series of explanatory diagrams on dental solutions for Dr. Arnold Chernoff, DDS. Created for web site pages. I present some of the most recent:
A Softer Style: Illustration Series for Dr. Chernoff.”
Design from Inside Out by Liane Sebastian
Say More with Less by Liane Sebastian

Sebastian survival #3

• INFORMATION GRAPHICS

To prepare a Family Book from genealogy research, I participate in Facebook groups. Everyone doing family history investigation has “brick walls.” I have isolated an individual in Germany that drops off the information records in the mid-1700’s. So this is a test to see if anyone in the network can offer assistance. I prepared a simple graphic to attract the eye versus just pose the question, and composed a blog entry with more detail. “Search for Sebastian Surname” explains the research so far.

Different Similarities icon by Liane

• THEME ILLUSTRATION

Composing photographic collages is not something new. What is new is using composed images (much like setting up still lifes), capturing the change within the scene imposed by time and weather variations, is my series on time. “Anticipating Change” expresses my thought-process on the seasonal entry.

What all the projects have in common is the challenge of symbolism. From a diagram to an expressive composition, the single visual must grab. It has to instantly tell a story. It may invite the viewer to know more, but it must give them a reason.

—Always inspired, Liane

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CONTACTS:

Liane Sebastian wears an editor’s hat, designer’s coat, and artist’s shoes.

BLOG: http://www.publishingpioneer.wordpress.com

PORTFOLIO: https://lianesebastianillustration.wordpress.com/portfolio/

LINKEDIN: www.linkedin.com/in/lianesebastian

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Liane-Sebastian-Illustration-742565389187170/

EMAIL: lianesebastian9@gmail.com

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