Tag Archives: historical illustration

A Chart of Strategic Choices

There are always stories in the numbers. The first way to understand genealogical data is to chart it. Tracing three families from 1700 to 1850 is the foreground of a pivotal point in history. Within their data, a strategy is revealed, reflective of the background history. This interplay also dictates the approach to chart design. Continue reading

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A Boast of Modesty

History can show the extraordinary in the ordinary, and to study reveals what is carried forward and what is lost. A family’s history can be displayed through the places they lived—the architecture and the circumstances surrounding. This illustration, of a modest house in Züsch Germany, expresses this interplay of influences. Continue reading

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Historical Hessen Hints

The influence of technology and politics filters down to affect the small villages circa 1600s. In the battleground of the Thirty Years Wars, Southwestern Germany was the stage for the conflict and the innovations. These factors show in family history data. But how to pinpoint to the actual events? Continue reading

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Drawing Forward from the Past

As more databases become public for family genealogists, using the facts to express the time, place, and relationships offers new graphic challenges. Illustration makes this data come alive. Family trees, maps, and architectural recreations give meaning to the past. Continue reading

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Drawing Backwards in Time

If we can tell where we are going from where we have been, might this also be true of buildings and places? Often there are no photos to show what we wish to know. Taking a 125 year old house that has only clues for its past appearance, I recreate how it must have looked from research. The before and after illustrations reveal more than just architecture, but mirror the changes of lifestyles through time. Continue reading

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